PTN Spotlight: Paula Delmore, Wesley Medical Center

Paula Delmore, left, with Dr. Barry Bloom, Wesley Medical Center Medical Director

Paula Delmore has actively participated in the support of clinical research for the past 30 years. Although the majority of her expertise is in the role of site study coordinator, she has served in the roles of multi-site coordinator, sub-investigator, and principal investigator. Her main strengths lie in her attention to detail and solid understanding of clinical trial execution in the neonatal area. Her team routinely performs as a highest enroller, which speaks to her exemplary coordination and good communication with providers, nursing staff, and families. We sat down with Paula to learn more about her work and involvement with the Pediatrics Trial Network.

Q: How long have you worked at Wesley Medical Center and what are your primary responsibilities?

A: I have been at Wesley Medical Center for 40 years and currently work in an administrative role. I supervise nurse practitioners, physician assistants, and support personnel with the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU).

Q: How does your role as a site coordinator with PTN overlap with your responsibilities as part of the Wesley Medical Center administrative staff?

A: I’ve been working with our Medical Director, Dr. Barry Bloom, for 35 years as a research coordinator. Over time, my role has advanced from being a research assistant to coordinating studies, and at times, being the principal investigator. I have been the principal investigator for a couple of PTN studies, most recently the PTN Baby TAPE study.

Q: How long has Wesley Medical Center been part of PTN?

A: From the very beginning! We were one of the first centers in the Rapid Start Network. We participated in the Fluconazole Safety study and all the early Pharmacokinetic (PK) Antibiotic studies.

Q: What have you found to be the most rewarding aspect of PTN?

A: PTN covers the gamut of pediatrics, but what I find most rewarding and exciting is that they continue to explore new therapies for neonates, and also validate standard practice where there is no prior evidence.

Q: Is there an experience you’ve had with PTN that has been particularly impactful?

A: Right now we are participating in the Sildenafil II study. As part of that study, it’s really great to work with families and offer them something that could potentially help their baby. Even though everything is an unknown, and we aren’t sure it’s going to help, it’s nice to offer parents the chance that our research and efforts will benefit their child. In general, giving families another option for excellence in care is what I find to be the most impactful.

Q: Why would you recommend other investigators become a part of PTN?

A: The responsiveness of the lead investigators is phenomenal. When questions arise, they are ready and available to answer and are very timely. This allows for the seamless continuation of patient enrollment and helps in meeting the randomization timelines. The PTN studies are some of the most organized and efficient I’ve been a part of.

 

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